Excerpt from His Dominion (Vol. 2 – The Saviour of the World)


The following is excerpted from The Saviour of the World – Volume Two – His Dominion, by Charlotte Mason.


“Our Father”

Hallow in my vain heart Thy holy Name,
Hallow in my dear home Thy tender Name,
Hallow in all Thy church Thy blessed Name,
Hallow throughout the world Thy mighty Name,
Our Father!

Within my rebel heart rule Thou, my King,
Over my wilful-dear, rule Thou, their King,
More constant, may Thy Church serve Thee, her King
And grant that all the nations know their King,
Our Father!

Ah Lord, my will is stubborn, do Thy will!
May they whom I hold dear adore Thy will,
In all Thy holy Church work Thou Thy will,
And bid the peoples haste to do Thy will,
Our Father!

Give all of us this day our daily bread,
The starving multitudes their daily bread,
Heart-hungry and mind-hungry, give us bread,
To us who hunger for Thee, give our bread,
Our Father!

My Father, I have sinned! Do thou forgive,
Thy church, Thy people, sin, do Thou forgive,
They sin who know Thee not, good Lord, forgive,
And teach us, sinful, that we too, forgive,
Our Father!

Temptation is at hand, deliver us!
We of this household pray, deliver us!
For all Thy church entreat, deliver us,
And for all men beseech, deliver us,
Our Father!

Our Father, hear Thy children’s prayer,
Keep us this day within Thy care!
Amen.

Thus, boldly, bade the Lord His people pray,
For God, our Father, will not say us nay;
Pray for ourselves, our dear ones, all mankind,—
We all are children to the Father’s mind:
For, our profoundest need, God’s grace to share—
His Name, His Will, His Kingdom, our first care;

Then, free, we ask for our immediate needs,
Meat, pardon, guidance; Who His children feeds
Will give, forgive, and guard us from our foes:
One sole condition doth the Lord impose;
“Forgiven, would’st thou be?” Remit his score,
Nor let thy brother’s trespass vex thee more!


Excerpted from The Saviour of the World – Volume Two – His Dominion by Charlotte Mason

Book #2 in “The Saviour of the World” series is out now!

saviour of the world vol 2The Saviour of the World, a six-volume set of epic poetry by Charlotte Mason on the life of Christ, now has the first two volumes in print.

I can hardly wait for the entire set!  :)

Excerpt from “The Sense of Wonder” by Rachel Carson

I recently found a copy of this book at the thrift store. I just now sat out on my back porch in the sunshine and read it while drinking my morning coffee.

And I have to say I LOVE it!

Highly recommended to inspire you to spend time outdoors with your little ones. Very CM-friendly text and ideas.  (I just wish there were an inexpensive paperback text-only version available — although the photographs are lovely.)

Excerpt:

I sincerely believe that for the child, and for the parent seeking to guide him, it is not half so important to know as to feel.  If facts are the seeds that later produce knowledge and wisdom, then the emotions and the impressions of the senses are the fertile soil in which the seeds must grow.  The years of early childhood are the time to prepare the soil.  Once the emotions have been aroused — a sense of the beautiful, the excitement of the new and the unknown, a feeling of sympathy, pity, admiration or love — then we wish for knowledge about the object of our emotional response.  Once found, it has lasting meaning.  It is more important to pave the way for the child to want to know than to put him on a diet of facts he is not ready to assimilate.

– Rachel Carson
The Sense of Wonder

Excerpt from The Holy Infancy (The Saviour of the World – Vol. 1)


Excerpted from The Holy Infancy (The Saviour of the World – Vol. 1)
by Charlotte M. Mason


saviour of the world vol 1Jesus in the Wilderness

Jesus, being full of the Holy Ghost, returned
From Jordan, and straightway the Spirit driveth
Him forth to the wilderness. For forty days
There was he tempted of Satan, and nothing ate:
And He was with the wild beasts all the nights.

Most men have solemn hours of inward searching,
Dedicate purpose, ere they set themselves
To take up that lifework appointed them;—
How best its tasks fulfil, how ’scape its perils,
How worthily and for God’s glory work,
For service of men, too, and their own weal?
All men have chart to study, course mapped out
By other men who journeyed that same way:
Traditions, documents, books, wait on all
Who law or physic or a craftsman’s trade
Would follow; these, and the counsels of friends:
No man goeth forth on an unbeaten track.

But this Man, driven into the wilderness—
Not one had been the way that He must tread;
No common calling of mankind was His;
No waymarks of past travelers showed His path
Through perilous wilderness His calling led Him—
An-hungered, He, for grace and heavenly goodness,
Of wild beasts beset, of Satan hindered:—
Those forty days were as the years to come.
Alone, the winepress trod He: “was there, then,
Nor chart nor compass for His way prepared?
The Scriptures of His people! There was traced,
On hundred luminous sheets, his heavy road.
No man had been His way, nor any should;
No man had done His work, nor any could:
But earthly father sets, plain-writ, the tasks
His son must learn: even so had God the Father,
Throughout the ages, thought upon His Son;
And given to chosen men to write in Book,
A little here, and there a little more,
All guiding precepts that the Christ alone
Should know to follow: vicissitudes had marked
On that untraveled land, unvoyaged sea,
Whereon must go the Saviour of the World.
What He should speak, how minister, how suffer,—
These things the counsels of God had occupied
Ere prophet spake or Moses gave the Law.

Not all unmapped His way, obscure His end,
To the Redeemer in the Wilderness:
Familiar with the guide-book of His course
Through years of labour, studious, purposeful,
It remained to order knowledge, shape His plans:—
How thus, and thus, knowing the people well,
He should begin the work of their salvation;
Teach them to think new thoughts, new ways pursue,
Toward new ends, undreamed of hitherto:
“Behold, I make all new!” His awful word,
And ever, as He thought, the Tempter came;
The Accuser had an ill word for the people;
That Mocker plied Him with, Yea, hath God said?
Evermore, What’s the Good? that Hopeless cried—
All his insidious temptings so conveyed
That purest heart might not perceive their guile,
Wisest and meekest, scarce their pride discern.

Was’t thus, or otherwise temptation came
To Christ, our Lord, our Life, our one sole Hope?
Scarce dare we ask, or let our reverent thought,
Obtrusive, scan the record, were we not told,—
“In all points He was tempted like as we,
But without sin.” Behoves us then to asks,
For soul’s instructions, how His temptings came,
Lest like assailing buffet our weak frame.

by Charlotte Mason
from The Holy Infancy
The Saviour of the World – Volume One

Charlotte Mason’s Poetry


saviour of the world vol 1I’m so excited!

Although there are several online text versions available of Charlotte Mason’s six-volume set of epic poetry on the life of Christ (The Saviour of the World), I’ve always wished for actual books I could hold in my hands.  And preferably books that didn’t have to be ordered at high expense from a secondhand shop in the UK.  I’m extremely frugal (i.e.:  “broke”).  I’m sort of old fashioned, too, and honestly still prefer curling up with a cup of something warm and an actual book — with actual pages to turn! — than curling up with my Kindle.  Although I do love my Kindle.

I’m excited to announce that my longtime wish for a book version of The Saviour of the World has come true!  The first volume, The Holy Infancy, is now available in an inexpensive paperback format.  (The other five volumes will be released over the next couple of months.)

This really is a dream-come-true for me.  Can you hear me squealing with joy from there? :D

New to CM? I recommend this book …

CMeducationPeople often ask where I recommend someone begin if they’re looking to start applying CM methods in their homeschool as quickly and easily as possible.

I always recommend people start with reading Catherine Levison’s book, A Charlotte Mason Education: A Home Schooling How-to Manual.

It was a life-saver for me many years ago. Even after having been homeschooling in a CM fashion for several years when it first came out, this little gem of a book gave me a fresh, practical view of how simple this learning philosophy can be.

The Child Should Be Made Familiar with Natural Objects


The Child Should Be Made Familiar with Natural Objects 
by Charlotte Mason
Excerpted from The Outdoor Life of Children


517pDeJHtkLAn Observant Child Should be Put in the Way of Things Worth Observing

But what is the use of being a ‘very observant child,’ if you are not put in the way of things worth observing? And here is the difference between the streets of a town and the sights and sounds of the country. There is plenty to be seen in a town and children accustomed to the ways of the streets become nimble-witted enough. But the scraps of information to be picked up in a town are isolated fragments; they do not hang on to anything else, nor come to anything more; the information may be convenient, but no one is the wiser for knowing which side of the street is Smith’s, and which turning leads to Thompson’s shop.

Every Natural Object a Member of a Series

Now take up a natural object, it does not matter what, and you are studying one of a group, a member of a series; whatever knowledge you get about it is so much towards the science which includes all of its kind. Break off an elder twig in the spring; you notice a ring of wood round a centre of pith, and there you have at a glance a distinguishing character of a great division of the vegetable world. You pick up a pebble. Its edges are perfectly smooth and rounded: why? You ask. It is water-worn, weather-worn. And that little pebble brings you face to face with disintegration, the force to which, more than to any other, we owe the aspects of the world which we call picturesque––glen, ravine, valley, hill. It is not necessary that the child should be told anything about disintegration or dicotyledon, only that he should observe the wood and pith in the hazel twig, the pleasant roundness of the pebble; by-and-by he will learn the bearing of the facts with which he is already familiar––a very different thing from learning the reason why of facts which have never come under his notice.

Power Will Pass, More and More, into the Hands of Scientific Men

It is infinitely well worth of the mother’s while to take some pains every day to secure, in the first place, that her children spend hours daily amongst rural and natural objects; and, in the second place, to infuse into them, or rather to cherish in them, the love of investigation. “I say it deliberately,” says Kingsley, “as a student of society and of history: power will pass more and more into the hands of scientific men. They will rule, and they will act––cautiously, we may hope, and modestly, and charitably––because in learning true knowledge they will have learnt also their own ignorance, and the vastness, the complexity, the mystery of Nature. But they will also be able to rule, they will be able to act, because they have taken the trouble to learn the facts and the laws of Nature.”

Intimacy with Nature Makes for Personal Well-being

But to enable them to swim with the stream is the least of the benefits this early training should confer on the children; a love of Nature, implanted so early that it will seem to them hereafter to have been born in them, will enrich their lives with pure interests, absorbing pursuits, health, and good humour. “I have seen,” says the same writer, “the young man of fierce passions and uncontrollable daring expend healthily that energy which threatened daily to plunge him into recklessness, if not into sin, upon hunting out and collecting, through rock and bog, snow and tempest, every bird and egg of the neighbouring forest . . . I have seen the young London beauty, amid all the excitement and temptation of luxury and flattery, with her heart pure, and her mind occupied in a boudoir full of shells and fossils, flowers and seaweeds, keeping herself unspotted from the world, by considering the lilies of the fields of the field, how they grow.”


To learn more about what Charlotte Mason had to say about children, nature, and science, read The Outdoor Life of Children: The Importance of Nature Study and Outside Activities.

A Twaddle-Free Education – price reduced!

51BlGAcUHnLThe price is currently reduced on the paperback edition of my new book, A Twaddle-Free Education.

The book was originally $10.99 … but has been reduced temporarily to $8.79!  If you purchase a paperback copy, you can also get a free Kindle ebook version (regularly $1.99).

So if you buy the paperback and also order the Kindle ebook,  you’ll essentially save $4+ off the original prices!  :)

 

Nature Study Poetic Idea

51N0LJzBviLWhile reading a required book in the MFA program this week, it struck me how —  for those of us living in urban environments — modern nature study and nature walks often involve city sights and sounds as well as the local flora and fauna. Harryette Mullen’s book of poetry, Urban Tumbleweed: Notes from a Tanka Diary, is the author’s poetic reflections on a year of walking outdoors in LA, in local parks, and places she visited throughout the year.  She often combines her observations of nature with her observations of city life, people, streets, etc.

Mullen chose the Japanese tanka form as her way of recording her walks.  A tanka is a 31 syllable poem often reflecting on the role of the human in relation to nature.  I had a brainstorm while reading this book, that perhaps a short daily (or weekly) tanka (or haiku) assignment for the kiddos might be an excellent addition to their nature journals or other journaling/notebooking ventures.

Special Mother’s Day Week eBook Give-Away!

  • UPDATE:  This special Mother’s Day ebook give-away has ended but there are reduced prices available on several of the titles.

The ebook versions of three of my recently released (or re-released) books are FREE this week!  Tell your friends! :)


51BlGAcUHnLA Twaddle-Free Education

An introduction to Charlotte Mason’s timeless educational ideas.  Are you disappointed with dumbed-down reading material (“twaddle”) written for children? Do you wish for your children to feast their hearts and minds on noble ideas, fine art, and great literature? Are you hoping your children gain an appreciation of nature and a deep understanding of natural sciences? Most importantly, do you want your children to develop a lifetime love of learning? If you answered “yes,” you may discover a Charlotte Mason-inspired twaddle-free education is just what you’ve been looking for. In the mid-1990’s, I set up one of the first Charlotte Mason homeschooling websites and edited The Charlotte Mason Monthly ezine. I currently edit The Charlotte Mason eMagazine.


41rIlTMZdiLThe Original Simple Mom’s Idea Book

Hints and hacks for home and family.  The Original Simple Mom’s Idea Book contains tips and suggestions for everything from cooking, saving money, celebrating the holidays, and just generally raising a family. If you’ve been looking for some simple ideas for life and homemaking … from someone who’s been around the block more than once or twice … look no further. Have no fear, the Original Simple Mom is here!


BookCoverImageMix-n-Match Recipes

Creative ideas for today’s busy kitchens.  Do you remember that old children’s story, Stone Soup? Everyone came along and threw a little of this and a little of that into the pot with the stone, and before their eyes, the first unofficial Mix and Match soup was born! And remember how much they all loved it? Contributing something to the finished product goes a long way toward increasing a child’s enjoyment of their meal.

Just think of Mix-n-Match cooking as an art form all its own. This book will give you the general guidelines and starting points—you take it from there and see what tasty concoctions your kitchen has hiding in the dark recesses of its shelves and drawers. To get started using this book, you won’t need to run out to the store to stock up on hard to find ingredients. Just pick from what you already have on hand.  Save time, save money, and save your sanity!


Hurry!  These special Mother’s Day offers are only good through Thursday, May 14th.  After that the ebooks return to their regular price of $2.99.  Feel free to pass this information onto your friends.

Happy Mother’s Day!  :)