Category Archives: Guest Authors

Guest Article: Nature Gifts and Holiday Ideas

by Toni Albert
Guest Contributor

For me, the holiday season begins with a long, leisurely walk. Leisurely but not inattentive. I am paying close attention to anything that catches my eye (or nose) because of its shape, color, texture, fragrance, or interest. It’s a gathering expedition. Continue reading

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Guest Article: Home School Science – Studying Microclimates


by Sheila Carroll
Guest Contributor


Getting out into the woods, yard or even nearby vacant lot is one of the best means of gaining an understanding of natural processes–a key discipline in the sciences. Charlotte Mason, a British educational reformer saw the study of nature as the means of training the senses to absorb the all-important details and then to draw conclusions. Continue reading

Guest Article: The Missing Ingredient in Reading Instruction


by Sheila Carroll
Guest Contributor


What if there was one simple thing you could do to ensure your child would read well and enjoy reading?

What if that thing didn’t cost a penny?

Would you be interested?

Continue reading

Guest Article: “Just What IS a Living Book?”

Mother Reading to Sonby Suz Stewart
Guest Contributor

Charlotte Mason was a Victorian educational reformer. One of her biggest contributions to the world of education was the concept of using only “living” books in her classrooms. Many new homeschoolers, and homeschoolers new to Charlotte Mason’s methods, haven’t a clue what a living books is or how to spot one, however. This article will endeavor to rectify that situation.

A living book is defined as any book that is literary in nature. That is, it has the following attributes:

  • Engaging, interesting, lively text
  • Literary elements – plot, descriptive passages, poetic language
  • It has stood the test of time – it’s just as interesting to today’s reader as it was to its original audience
  • It has something to say, something to teach – a redeeming quality, a moral, a character builder – it asks something introspective of the reader

Continue reading

Teaching Elementary Science with Great Literature


by Sheila Carroll
Guest Contributor


How do you teach a fact-heavy subject like science with great literature? First, science is not fact-heavy, or, at least it ought not to be. British educator, Charlotte Mason called science the study of “the great scheme of the unity of life”.

Abstract concepts become easy to picture and understand when they are experienced in context. A picture-packed, glitzy book filled with facts cannot teach “the great scheme of unity of life” but literature and hands-on experimentation can. Continue reading