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Category Archives: nature

Charlotte Mason eMagazine – Late February 2016


charlotte mason portrait (2)The following are excerpts from the latest issue of the Charlotte Mason eMagazine. Be sure to visit the magazine’s website and sign up for email notifications so you’ll never miss an issue! Subscribe here:


A Charlotte Mason Education in High School

“I ran across this wonderful quote recently while rereading Susan Schaeffer Macaulay’s For the Children’s Sake: ‘Also, it would be wrong not to equip our children with ‘passports’ to our society. Th…”


A Field Trip ~ Exploring Nature With Children

“Firstly, I apologise for the misleading nature of the title of the post! If you are following along with Exploring Nature With Children, you will know that this week is field trip week. We are quit…”


Nature Study On Periscope With Leah Boden

 “I am really excited to let you know about a wonderful opportunity to learn more about the Charlotte Mason method of nature study. My lovely friend Leah will be doing a live periscope event tomorrow…”


Keeping a Nature Journal

“Nature journaling is an immensely rewarding pursuit for both parent and child. In Charlotte Mason’s own words: Consider, too, what an unequaled mental training the child-naturalist is getting for …”


The Beauty Of Earth And Heavens

The Beauty Of Earth And Heavens – Posted on February 20, 2016 by raisinglittleshoots – “They must be let alone, left to themselves a great deal, to take in what they can of the beauty of earth and heave…”


University of Derby: Children in Touch With Nature Do Better on Tests

University of Derby: Children in Touch With Nature Do Better on Tests Derby Telegraph – February 26, 2016 | By Zena Hawley | In the News “CHILDREN who are in touch with nature achieve better results…”


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The Child Should Be Made Familiar with Natural Objects


The Child Should Be Made Familiar with Natural Objects 
by Charlotte Mason
Excerpted from The Outdoor Life of Children


517pDeJHtkLAn Observant Child Should be Put in the Way of Things Worth Observing

But what is the use of being a ‘very observant child,’ if you are not put in the way of things worth observing? And here is the difference between the streets of a town and the sights and sounds of the country. There is plenty to be seen in a town and children accustomed to the ways of the streets become nimble-witted enough. But the scraps of information to be picked up in a town are isolated fragments; they do not hang on to anything else, nor come to anything more; the information may be convenient, but no one is the wiser for knowing which side of the street is Smith’s, and which turning leads to Thompson’s shop.

Every Natural Object a Member of a Series

Now take up a natural object, it does not matter what, and you are studying one of a group, a member of a series; whatever knowledge you get about it is so much towards the science which includes all of its kind. Break off an elder twig in the spring; you notice a ring of wood round a centre of pith, and there you have at a glance a distinguishing character of a great division of the vegetable world. You pick up a pebble. Its edges are perfectly smooth and rounded: why? You ask. It is water-worn, weather-worn. And that little pebble brings you face to face with disintegration, the force to which, more than to any other, we owe the aspects of the world which we call picturesque––glen, ravine, valley, hill. It is not necessary that the child should be told anything about disintegration or dicotyledon, only that he should observe the wood and pith in the hazel twig, the pleasant roundness of the pebble; by-and-by he will learn the bearing of the facts with which he is already familiar––a very different thing from learning the reason why of facts which have never come under his notice.

Power Will Pass, More and More, into the Hands of Scientific Men

It is infinitely well worth of the mother’s while to take some pains every day to secure, in the first place, that her children spend hours daily amongst rural and natural objects; and, in the second place, to infuse into them, or rather to cherish in them, the love of investigation. “I say it deliberately,” says Kingsley, “as a student of society and of history: power will pass more and more into the hands of scientific men. They will rule, and they will act––cautiously, we may hope, and modestly, and charitably––because in learning true knowledge they will have learnt also their own ignorance, and the vastness, the complexity, the mystery of Nature. But they will also be able to rule, they will be able to act, because they have taken the trouble to learn the facts and the laws of Nature.”

Intimacy with Nature Makes for Personal Well-being

But to enable them to swim with the stream is the least of the benefits this early training should confer on the children; a love of Nature, implanted so early that it will seem to them hereafter to have been born in them, will enrich their lives with pure interests, absorbing pursuits, health, and good humour. “I have seen,” says the same writer, “the young man of fierce passions and uncontrollable daring expend healthily that energy which threatened daily to plunge him into recklessness, if not into sin, upon hunting out and collecting, through rock and bog, snow and tempest, every bird and egg of the neighbouring forest . . . I have seen the young London beauty, amid all the excitement and temptation of luxury and flattery, with her heart pure, and her mind occupied in a boudoir full of shells and fossils, flowers and seaweeds, keeping herself unspotted from the world, by considering the lilies of the fields of the field, how they grow.”


To learn more about what Charlotte Mason had to say about children, nature, and science, read The Outdoor Life of Children: The Importance of Nature Study and Outside Activities.

Nature’s Teaching


by Charlotte Mason


517pDeJHtkLWatch a child standing at gaze at some sight new to him––a plough at work, for instance––and you will see he is as naturally occupied as is a babe at the breast; he is, in fact, taking in the intellectual food which the working faculty of his brain at this period requires. In his early years the child is all eyes; he observes, or, more truly, he perceives, calling sight, touch, taste, smell, and hearing to his aid, that he may learn all that is discoverable by him about every new thing that comes under his notice.

Everybody knows how a baby fumbles over with soft little fingers, and carries to his mouth, and bangs that it may produce what sound there is in it, the spoon or doll which supercilious grown-up people give him to ‘keep him quiet.’ The child is at his lessons, and is learning all about it at a rate utterly surprising to the physiologist, who considers how much is implied in the act of ‘seeing,’ for instance: that to the infant, as to the blind adult restored to sight, there is at first no difference between a flat picture and a solid body,––that the ideas of form and solidity are not obtained by sight at all, but are the judgments of experience.

Then, think of the vague passes in the air the little fist makes before it lays hold of the object of desire, and you see how he learns the whereabouts of things, having as yet no idea of direction. And why does he cry for the moon? Why does he crave equally, a horse or a house-fly as an appropriate plaything? Because far and near, large and small, are ideas he has yet to grasp. The child has truly a great deal to do before he is in a condition to ‘believe his own eyes’; but Nature teaches so gently, so gradually, so persistently, that he is never overdone, but goes on gathering little stores of knowledge about whatever comes before him.

And this is the process the child should continue for the first few years of his life. Now is the storing time which should be spent in laying up images of things familiar. By-and-by he will have to conceive of things he has never seen: how can he do it except by comparison with things he has seen and knows? By-and-by he will be called upon to reflect, understand, reason; what material will he have, unless he has a magazine of facts to go upon?

The child who has been made to observe how high in the heavens the sun is at noon on a summer’s day, how low at noon on a day in mid-winter, is able to conceive of the great heat of the tropics under a vertical sun, and to understand the climate of a place depends greatly upon the mean height the sun reaches above the horizon.

Excerpted from The Outdoor Life of Children

Guest Article: Nature Gifts and Holiday Ideas

by Toni Albert
Guest Contributor

For me, the holiday season begins with a long, leisurely walk. Leisurely but not inattentive. I am paying close attention to anything that catches my eye (or nose) because of its shape, color, texture, fragrance, or interest. It’s a gathering expedition. Continue reading

Educational Gift Ideas: Science & Nature Study

The grandparents always loved to buy educational toys, games,playstation headsets, and supplies for my kiddos, even the little Raptor Fidget Spinners | The Original Hand Fidget Toys they got for them. I think it made the grandparents feel like they were helping to participate in homeschooling the grandkids by giving them educational gifts.  If you have relatives who needs some gift giving ideas, send them here. Continue reading

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